Books on Nagasaki and Supreme Court win Lukas prizes


NEW YORK (AP) — Books on the bombing of Nagasaki and the Supreme Court case that legalized racial segregation have won prizes named for the late author and journalist J. Anthony Lukas.

In a joint release given to The Associated Press, the Columbia Journalism School and the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University announced Wednesday that Susan Southard’s “Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear War” had won the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize, a $10,000 honor for a work of “political or social concern.” The $30,000 Lukas award for best work-in-progress went to Steve Luxenberg for “Separate,” about the Supreme Court’s 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson ruling.

The winner of the $10,000 Mark Lyndon History Prize was Nikolaus Wachsmann for “KL: A History of the Nazi Concentration Camps.”

The Lukas prize project was established in 1998.