AP News in Brief at 11:04 p.m. EDT


Police charge Trump campaign manager with battery

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Police charged Donald Trump’s campaign manager with simple battery Tuesday as a videotaped altercation with a reporter transformed what was another messy campaign sideshow into a criminal court summons. Trump decried the charges.

Jupiter, Florida, police determined that probable cause existed to file a criminal complaint against the Republican front-runner’s most trusted political adviser, Corey Lewandowski, for an altercation that took place after a campaign appearance earlier in the month. Police on Tuesday morning issued Lewandowski a notice to appear before a judge on May 4 for the misdemeanor charge, which carries up to a year in jail.

The unexpected development injects a court battle into an already contentious Republican primary season just a week before a high-stakes election in Wisconsin. It came on a day that all five presidential contenders campaigned in the state, overshadowing Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s endorsement of Ted Cruz and Bernie Sanders’ push to narrow Hillary Clinton’s delegate lead.

Speaking to reporters on his airplane in Wisconsin on Tuesday, Trump vowed to stand by his campaign manager and lashed out at the young female reporter who conveyed the incident to police.

“How do you know those bruises weren’t there before?” the New York businessman charged.

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Trump rescinds pledge to back GOP nominee; Walker backs Cruz

BROOKFIELD, Wis. (AP) — Donald Trump, turning his focus to Wisconsin even as another controversy cast a shadow over his campaign, said Tuesday he will no longer honor his pledge to support the eventual Republican pick for president. And his two Republican rivals, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, also refused to say they would support Trump or whoever is the nominee.

All three Republicans appeared at a CNN town hall in Milwaukee one week before Wisconsin’s April 5 primary. Both Democratic candidates, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, also campaigned in the state.

Trump said he was rescinding his promise to back the GOP nominee because “I have been treated very unfairly.” He listed the Republican National Committee, the Republican Party and party establishment among those he believes have wronged him.

Kasich and Cruz also refused to say whether they would stand by the pledge.

“If the nominee is somebody I think is really hurting the country, and dividing the country, I can’t stand behind them,” Kasich said. Cruz refused to commit to backing Trump, saying if he were the nominee it would hand the election to Clinton.

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10 Things to Know for Wednesday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Wednesday:

1. TRUMP’S CAMPAIGN MANAGER ACCUSED OF BATTERY

The charge against Corey Lewandowski stems from a videotaped altercation with a reporter earlier this month.

2. EGYPT HIJACKER DESCRIBED AS ‘PSYCHOLOGICALLY UNSTABLE’

The man’s explosives turn out to be fake and he surrenders with all passengers released unharmed after forcing a domestic EgyptAir flight to land in Cyprus.

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Apple remains in dark on how FBI hacked iPhone without help

WASHINGTON (AP) — The FBI’s announcement that it mysteriously hacked into an iPhone is a public setback for Apple Inc., as consumers suddenly discover they can’t keep their most personal information safe. Meanwhile, Apple remains in the dark about how to restore the security of its flagship product.

The government said it was able to break into an iPhone used by a gunman in a mass shooting in California, but it didn’t say how. That puzzled Apple software engineers — and outside experts — about how the FBI broke the digital locks on the phone without Apple’s help. It also complicated Apple’s job repairing flaws that jeopardize its software.

The Justice Department’s announcement that it was dropping a legal fight to compel Apple to help it access the phone also took away any obvious legal avenues Apple might have used to learn how the FBI did it.

Magistrate Judge Sheri Pym vacated her Feb. 16 order, which compelled Apple to help the FBI hack their phone, on Tuesday.

The Justice Department declined through a spokeswoman to comment Tuesday.

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Brussels attack victims came from Belgium, worldwide

Victims of the attacks on Brussels’ airport and subway included commuters heading to work and travelers starting long-anticipated vacations. They came from dozens of nations to a city that’s home to the European Union, NATO and other international institutions.

Among the confirmed dead:

James Cain learned only last Tuesday that his daughter had married Alex Pinczowski. Two days later, he learned that Alex and his sister Sascha, Dutch siblings who lived in New York, had both died in the Brussels airport suicide bombing.

As Cain and his daughter Cameron hunted for news about Alex and Sascha following the deadly blasts in the Belgian capital, Cameron told her father she had married Alex in 2013.

On Tuesday, Cain called the news of his daughter’s marriage “the bright spot in our otherwise anguishing week.”

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North Carolina governor’s race intensifying over LGBT rights

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The North Carolina governor’s race has suddenly become a referendum on discrimination.

Republican Gov. Pat McCrory, seeking re-election in what’s anticipated to be one of the nation’s most heated and expensive campaigns, is doubling down on a sweeping law he signed last week preventing local governments from protecting people on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity when they use public accommodations such as hotels and restaurants. People also would have to use multi-stall bathrooms that match their birth certificates at state agencies and public schools and universities.

Attorney General Roy Cooper, the governor’s Democratic challenger, announced Tuesday that his office won’t defend this “national embarrassment” against a federal lawsuit filed by two transgender men, a lesbian law professor and civil rights groups.

“We are here because the governor has signed statewide legislation that puts discrimination into the law,” Cooper announced. Citing criticism from a growing list of major corporations and sports organizations, he said: “It will set North Carolina’s economy back if we don’t repeal it.”

McCrory complained this week that a well-coordinated national campaign is “distorting the truth,” and in a video Tuesday accused Cooper of “inventing conflict that simply doesn’t exist” to justify his argument to refuse to defend the law.

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Hijack drama ends in Cyprus with arrest of ‘unstable’ man

LARNACA, Cyprus (AP) — A man described as “psychologically unstable” hijacked a flight Tuesday from Egypt to Cyprus and threatened to blow it up. His explosives turned out to be fake, and he surrendered with all passengers released unharmed after a bizarre six-hour standoff.

As more became known about the motive of the 59-year-old Egyptian who was taken into custody, authorities characterized the commandeering of the EgyptAir jetliner not as an act of terrorism but more like a “family feud” with his former wife.

The aviation drama ended peacefully on the tarmac of Larnaca airport on the island nation’s southern coast with the surrender of a man identified by Cypriot and Egyptian authorities as Seif Eddin Mustafa.

The incident was likely to renew concerns about Egyptian airport security months after a Russian passenger plane was blown out of the sky over the Sinai Peninsula in a bombing claimed by the Islamic State group.

But Egyptian officials stressed that their security measures were not to blame, and there was praise for the EgyptAir flight crew. Pilot Amr Gamal told The Associated Press: “We rescued all the people and the man got arrested.”

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Tied 4-4 after Scalia’s death, high court gives unions a win

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the clearest sign yet of the impact of Justice Antonin Scalia’s death, U.S. labor unions scored a major victory Tuesday with a tie vote in a high-profile Supreme Court case they had once seemed all but certain to lose.

The 4-4 split, in a case that sharply divided the court’s liberal union supporters and their conservative opponents, demonstrated how much is riding on President Barack Obama’s effort to replace Scalia with a judge who could tilt the balance on the high court for years to come. Senate Republicans say they won’t consider any nomination until a new president takes office.

The vacancy helped the liberals this time. The deadlocked vote came in a case that considered whether unions representing government employees can collect fees from workers who choose not to join. California teachers backed by a conservative group said being forced to pay union fees violated the free-speech rights of nonmembers who disagree with the union’s policy positions.

The split vote left in place an appeals court ruling that upheld the collection of “fair share” fees from nonmembers.

The result was an unlikely reprieve for organized labor. It had seemed virtually certain that the high court would rule 5-4 to overturn a system that’s been in place nearly 40 years. But the court now is operating with only eight justices after the Feb. 13 death of Scalia, who had been expected to rule against the unions.

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Man convicted in 1957 killing of girl declares innocence

SYCAMORE, Ill. (AP) — A former security guard serving a life sentence in the 1957 slaying of a 7-year-old Illinois girl made an emotional statement declaring his innocence and pleaded with a judge Tuesday to consider his bid for freedom as soon as possible, citing a prosecutor’s scathing review of the investigation that landed him in prison.

With his legs and wrists shackled, Jack McCullough spoke up from a defense table when it became clear that the judge — while agreeing to start a process that could lead to a vacated conviction and a new trial — was going to adjourn the 20-minute hearing without setting the 76-year-old free.

“Your honor, I’ve been in prison locked up now for almost five years. I’m innocent, and I can prove I’m innocent,” McCullough said in a weak voice from behind a defense table, clearly disappointed. “There has to be an end to this somewhere.”

McCullough’s stepdaughter said she knew from his recent letters and from his demeanor in court that he believed the judge might order him to be released immediately.

“He thought he was going home,” Janey O’Connor said after the hearing.

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Archaeologists digging at Malcolm X’s boyhood home in Boston

BOSTON (AP) — Archeologists are digging at a boyhood home of Malcolm X in an effort to uncover more about the slain black rights activist’s early life as well as the property’s long history, which possibly includes Native American settlement.

The two-week archaeological dig began Tuesday outside a two-and-a-half story home in Boston’s historically black Roxbury neighborhood that was built in 1874.

City Archaeologist Joseph Bagley said his office chose to dig up the site because it’s likely that work will be needed soon to shore up the foundation of the vacant and run down structure.

“This is kind of a now-or-never dig,” he said. “If we don’t do this, the site will be destroyed. We can’t afford to wait.”

Among Tuesday’s early finds was a large piece of fine porcelain that Bagley says was likely part of a dish set owned by the family of Malcolm X’s sister, which still owns the house.