BC-Missing Malaysian Plane,PACKAGEADVISORY


EDITORS:

Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared March 8, 2014, after veering off course on a trip from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people aboard. Only a wing flap has been recovered so far, despite a massive search of the depths of the Indian Ocean that has cost tens of millions of dollars. Australian authorities are nearly finished searching the area of ocean that is considered to be the plane’s most likely resting place, raising the possibility that they may come up empty. What would that mean for the search effort, airline safety and the families of the lost passengers and crew?

Below is a list of enterprise stories The Associated Press has produced to mark the anniversary:

___

THURSDAY, MARCH 3

MISSING MALAYSIAN PLANE-PILOT

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — Nearly two years after Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared, the pilot’s family must cope not only with his loss but with the theory that he was to blame. His sister tells the AP that he’s been judged “guilty until proven innocent. This sets us back in the Dark Ages.” By Eileen Ng. SENT: 1,100 words, photos. Only on AP.

___

FRIDAY, MARCH 4

MISSING MALAYSIAN PLANE-THE SEARCH

SYDNEY — As the two-year anniversary of the disappearance of Flight 370 approaches, the situation would seem decidedly grim: the underwater hunt of a punishing patch of ocean that has trudged along since late 2014 has thus far come up dry, the stretch of water left to search is narrowing and skepticism of whether crews are looking in the right place continues to grow. By Kristen Gelineau. SENT: 1,200 words, photos, video.

MISSING MALAYSIAN PLANE-SAFETY

WASHINGTON — A U.N. agency that sets global aviation standards has moved to address some of the more glaring safety gaps underscored when Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared two years ago with hundreds of passengers aboard. By Joan Lowy. SENT: 1,000 words, photos.

___

SATURDAY, MARCH 5

MISSING MALAYSIAN PLANE-THEORIES

SYDNEY — From a hijacking to an alien abduction, countless theories have arisen about the fate of the Malaysian airliner that disappeared nearly two years ago. With search crews just months away from finishing their thus-far fruitless sweep of the vast patch of Indian Ocean where Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is believed to have crashed, officials appear no closer to solving one of the most mind-boggling mysteries of modern times. That stubborn lack of resolution has only increased speculation about what might have happened to the Boeing 777 after it vanished with 239 people on board on March 8, 2014. By Kristen Gelineau. SENT: 750 words, photos.

___

SUNDAY, MARCH 6

MISSING MALAYSIAN PLANE-A SEARCHER’S STORY

SYDNEY — The shifts are punishing: 12 hours on, 12 hours off, seven days a week, for a month straight — though ping pong and Monopoly help break up the monotony. But for the American man who designed the sonar equipment being used in the hunt for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, spending nearly six months at sea searching for the plane was something of an honor. By Kristen Gelineau. SENT: 1,200 words, photos.

MALAYSIA-AIRLINE-TURNAROUND

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — After one of its jets went missing and another was shot down two years ago, Malaysia Airlines appeared to be on the ropes. But the twin disasters also forced the national carrier’s government owners to do what had seemed previously impossible and make sweeping changes. The radical overhaul, including slashing routes to Europe in order to focus on Asian traffic, give it a good chance of returning to profitability, but the next challenge could be battling cutthroat competition from the region’s numerous budget carriers. By Kelvin Chan and Eileen Ng. SENT: 890 words, photos.

MISSING MALAYSIAN PLANE-IF IT’S FOUND

As many questions as there are with Flight 370 missing, many more will emerge when the plane is found. What will searchers recover? What will it reveal about the disappearance? And who will pay for it? SENT: 490 words, photos.

___

MONDAY, MARCH 7

MISSING MALAYSIAN PLANE-FAMILIES

BEIJING — Nearly every day, Dai Shuqin goes to the Malaysia Airlines office, hand-delivering a letter that nearly always says the same thing: “Tell us the truth, and get our loved ones back to us.” Then Dai, whose sister and much of her extended family vanished when the airlines’ Flight MH370 disappeared nearly two years ago, turns around and goes home to her small Beijing apartment. Most of the flight’s passengers were Chinese. So across China, dozens of families are still wrestling with how to cope with a plane that simply dropped from radar. Some of those families have filed lawsuits. Some have agreed not to. Many are debating what to do. And some, like Dai, find their only solace comes in believing that their relatives are still alive. Somewhere. Somehow. So they demand answers from an airline that insists, and which investigators agree, has few answers at all. By Peng Peng and Tim Sullivan. UPCOMING: 970 words by 1400GMT, photos, video.

___

TUESDAY, MARCH 8

Spot coverage expected in all formats.

___

The AP

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU