The Latest: Enbridge to pay $176M for Michigan oil spill


MARSHALL, Mich. (AP) — The Latest on a settlement between the federal government and Enbridge Energy Partners over a 2010 oil spill in southwestern Michigan (all times local):

5:20 p.m.:

Enbridge Energy Partners has reached a $176 million settlement with the federal government for the costliest inland oil spill in U.S. history.

Officials with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Justice announced the deal Wednesday involving a 2010 spill in southwestern Michigan. Enbridge says 843,000 gallons flowed from a ruptured pipe into the Kalamazoo River, while EPA contends the total exceeded 1 million gallons.

The settlement requires the Canadian company to pay a $61 million penalty, the second-largest ever imposed for violations of the Clean Water Act.

Other spending will go toward measures to prevent future oil spills from Enbridge’s U.S. pipeline network, which covers 2,000 miles in seven states.

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11 a.m.:

Enbridge Energy Partners will pay a $61 million penalty for the costliest inland oil spill in U.S. history under an agreement with federal officials.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Justice announced the settlement Wednesday over a 2010 pipeline rupture near Marshall, Michigan, that released an estimated 843,000 gallons of crude oil. A nearly 40-mile stretch of the Kalamazoo River was polluted as shoreline residents fled their homes.

The deal requires measures to prevent future spills, detect leaks and prepare for emergencies across Enbridge’s Lakehead network, a web of 14 pipelines extending more than 2,000 miles across seven states.

Company vice president Brad Shamla says Enbridge has been humbled and will meet the terms.