The Latest: California Legislature approves state budget


SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on California’s budget (all times local):

4:25 p.m.

California lawmakers have approved a state budget that boosts funding for safety net programs while socking away billions of dollars to prepare for a recession.

The Assembly and Senate voted Wednesday to send the $122.5 billion spending plan to Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown. He negotiated the agreement with Democratic legislative leaders and is expected to sign it into law.

Democrats have generally praised the budget as a significant investment in alleviating the harmful effects of poverty on children, though they did not win as much spending as they wanted.

Republicans warn that expanded long-term spending commitments will lead to deficits down the road.

The budget expands access to subsidized child care and repeals a controversial welfare law. It also raises vehicle registration fees by $10, generating $400 million.

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4 p.m.:

California’s $122.5 billion budget has cleared one of its final hurdles with a party-line vote in the Legislature’s lower chamber.

Democrats in the California Assembly approved the funding plan on a 52-27 vote Wednesday.

Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia of Bell Gardens applauded the inclusion of $400 million for early education and childcare in the deal. As vice chairwoman of the Legislative Women’s Caucus, she also rallied behind the Legislature’s repeal of a welfare measure that capped premiums.

San Francisco Assemblyman Phil Ting, a Democrat, says the agreement boosts state reserves to a historic level totaling more than $9 billion.

Republicans have warned that expanded long-term spending commitments will lead to deficits down the road.

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12 a.m.

California lawmakers are scheduled to vote on a state budget that boosts funding for safety net programs while socking away billions of dollars to prepare for a recession.

The full Legislature will decide Wednesday whether to back a budget agreement reached last week by Gov. Jerry Brown, Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon and Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon, all Democrats.

Democrats have generally praised the budget as a significant investment in alleviating the harmful effects of poverty on children. Republicans warned that expanded long-term spending commitments will lead to deficits down the road.

The budget is estimated at $122.5 billion. It would raise vehicle registration fees from $70 to $80 per year, generating about $400 million annually for several state agencies.