Hill embarks on ‘Ghana Beat’ program


Staff report



Among those that attended the Baldwin Wallace University’s “Ghana Beat” program are from left: Delaney Hill, Cinthea Fields, a government employee, Emily Armbrecht, Ciara Ford, Ireland Webb, Joanna Watts, Tyler Hawes, Sarah Brown, Dr. Christian Nsiah and Madison McNeil.


Contributed photo

Baldwin Wallace University’s “Ghana Beat” program at Elmina Castle.


Contributed photo | Ciara Ford

Baldwin Wallace University’s “Ghana Beat” program at the Dagbe Cultural Institute & Arts Centre. From left are: Sarah Brown, Mensah Ali, Tyler Hawes, Alex Morrow and Justin Frankeny.


Contributed photo

BEREA — Delaney Hill of London was among 19 students who participated in Baldwin Wallace’s “Ghana Beat: The Drums of Tradition and Change” study abroad program, a transformative three-week learning experience in multiple cities in Ghana, West Africa, including Accra, Kumasi, Kopeyia, Ho, Akosombo and Cape Coast, during the spring 2017 semester.

Hill, a graduate of London High School majoring in psychology, completed courses providing an in-depth understanding of Ghana’s politics and society as well as West African traditional music before going on the three-week experience led by business professor Dr. Christian Nsiah and music professor Josh Ryan.

The program provided opportunities for students to experience intensive traditional drumming sessions at the Dagbe Cultural Institute & Arts Centre in the village of Kopeyia and to study the political and legal systems of Ghana. They also toured several key areas, including the Ghana Parliament House, Central Business District, Cape Coast Castle and the W.E.B. Dubois Memorial Centre for Pan African Culture.

While abroad, the group also visited historical sites and major landmarks such as the Volta River, Wli waterfalls, markets, beaches, a monkey sanctuary, traditional villages, former slave castles at Cape Coast and Elmina, and West Africa’s highest rain forest canopy walkway at Kakum National Park.

Baldwin Wallace senior Ramona Smith had this to say about the trip, “Going to Ghana significantly enhanced my self-actualization. This trip gave me something to belong to, and something authentic to identify with. It changed my life.”

The Baldwin Wallace Study Abroad Center engages students through global exploration and off-campus study that enhances personal growth, educational enrichment and career development as part of the university’s liberal arts effort to cultivate contributing and compassionate citizens. Through faculty-led and independent study abroad opportunities, students can build strong communication skills, enhanced critical thinking and personal confidence from trekking the unknown.

Baldwin Wallace University, founded in 1845, was one of the first colleges to admit students without regard to race or gender. An independent, coeducational university of 4,000 students, Baldwin Wallace offers coursework in the liberal arts tradition in more than 80 academic areas. Located in Berea, 12 miles from downtown Cleveland, Baldwin Wallace offers students the cultural, educational and business advantages of a major metropolitan area.

Among those that attended the Baldwin Wallace University’s “Ghana Beat” program are from left: Delaney Hill, Cinthea Fields, a government employee, Emily Armbrecht, Ciara Ford, Ireland Webb, Joanna Watts, Tyler Hawes, Sarah Brown, Dr. Christian Nsiah and Madison McNeil.
http://www.madison-press.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/37/2017/11/web1_DelanyHillGovernmentbuildingpiccol.jpgAmong those that attended the Baldwin Wallace University’s “Ghana Beat” program are from left: Delaney Hill, Cinthea Fields, a government employee, Emily Armbrecht, Ciara Ford, Ireland Webb, Joanna Watts, Tyler Hawes, Sarah Brown, Dr. Christian Nsiah and Madison McNeil. Contributed photo

Baldwin Wallace University’s “Ghana Beat” program at Elmina Castle.
http://www.madison-press.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/37/2017/11/web1_Ghanabeatpiccol.jpgBaldwin Wallace University’s “Ghana Beat” program at Elmina Castle. Contributed photo | Ciara Ford

Baldwin Wallace University’s “Ghana Beat” program at the Dagbe Cultural Institute & Arts Centre. From left are: Sarah Brown, Mensah Ali, Tyler Hawes, Alex Morrow and Justin Frankeny.
http://www.madison-press.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/37/2017/11/web1_DagbeCulturalInstitutepiccol.jpgBaldwin Wallace University’s “Ghana Beat” program at the Dagbe Cultural Institute & Arts Centre. From left are: Sarah Brown, Mensah Ali, Tyler Hawes, Alex Morrow and Justin Frankeny. Contributed photo

Staff report