madison-press.com

London Council passes downtown parking restrictions

Jane Beathard jbeathard@civitasmedia.com

January 17, 2014

Parking on High Street in London between Union Street and Madison Road is restricted to two hours, following action by city council on Thursday, Jan. 16.


Parking on the city’s Main Street between Center and High streets is already limited to two hours.


Members passed an amended ordinance to also limit parking time on High Street, following a public hearing on the topic.


The original ordinance extended parking restrictions to Walnut Street on the east. But attorney Chris Brown, whose office is at 58 E. High, asked council to reconsider the scope of the measure and limit parking time only between Union and Main street.


Brown said restricted on-street parking at his office would have a negative impact on his property value. At the same time, it would not affect nearby KFC and London Food Mart — businesses that provide off-street parking.


Complaints by businessman Bob Richardson, owner of The Home Store at 11 E. High St., spurred the original ordinance. Richardson told council on Thursday that Madison County Courthouse employees used High Street parking spaces for their vehicles, leaving little room for his customers.


“It’s difficult to run a small business when courthouse employees park all day,” Richardson said.


Safety-services director Steve Hume noted current spaces leave little room for courthouse visitors and customers.


Brown noted opening of the new municipal courthouse on Oak Street will relieve some parking problems in downtown London.


The new building’s associated parking lot will accommodate 28 vehicles. The courthouse is slated for completion in April, according to county commissioner Mark Forrest.


In other meeting business on Thursday, city council approved a resolution supporting the renovation of Londonerry Apartments, 267 Bowman Court.


Community Action of Delaware, Madison and Union Counties and Fairfield Homes, Inc. will apply for an Ohio Housing Finance Agency grant in February to remodel 72 units of the complex and purchase additional land for greenspace, garden plots and a community building.


OHFA denied a similar grant application last year because it did not include greenspace, according to Rochelle Dennis Twining, community action executive director.